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Orthopedic Trauma

Orthopedic trauma is a subspecialty of orthopedic surgery that addresses complicated and/or multiple injuries to the bones, joints and soft tissues of the entire body following trauma.

Orthopedic Trauma

Our Orthopedic Trauma Specialists

Karl A. Bergmann, MD

Orthopedic Surgery,
Orthopedic Trauma Surgery

Megan A Brady, MD

Orthopedic Surgery,
Orthopedic Trauma Surgery

About Orthopedic Trauma

Orthopedic trauma is a subspecialty of orthopedic surgery that addresses complicated and/or multiple injuries to the bones, joints and soft tissues (muscles, tendons, ligaments) of the entire body following trauma.

At CHI Health Creighton University Medical Center - Bergan Mercy Level I Trauma Center, specially trained orthopedic trauma surgeons are available 24/7 to quickly assess patient injuries, and, if necessary, take them to the operating room within minutes.

Recovering from Orthopedic Trauma

Rehabilitation for orthopedic trauma begins while patients are in the hospital to help them regain maximum level of function as quickly as possible. Our rehabilitation therapy specialists assess motor functions and the ability to perform daily activities.

Rehabilitation is continued at Immanuel Rehabilitation Center, a state-of-the-art inpatient facility, which has received the highest level of accreditation awarded by the Joint Commission, and by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). These services are led by a team of physiatrists, physicians who specialize in physical rehabilitation.

After inpatient care, CHI Health at Home provides comprehensive home care services to help patients continue to heal in the comfort of their own homes.

Preventing Orthopedic Injury

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that injuries kill more than 180,000 people each year. More people between the ages of one and 44 die from injury, such as motor vehicle crashes, falls or homicides, than from any other cause, including cancer.

Of the many trauma injuries, falling is the number one reason for trauma admissions, affecting patients young and old. On playgrounds, more injuries happen on monkey bars than on any other equipment. Twenty to 30 percent of people over the age of 65 who fall suffer lacerations, hip fractures or head trauma.